Ajita Banerjie - Report Published

Ajita Banerjie got her Master’s degree in Social Work from Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai. As a part of her field project in TISS, she worked with the Kathkari Tribe in Maharashtra on issues of bonded labour at brick kilns and the effect of migration on health and education. For the final year dissertation, she studied the Hijra community in Mumbai and their negotiation with heteronormative spaces and structures in a gendered society. While in TISS, she worked as an intern with Alternative Law Forum, Bangalore, where she researched on gender-based violence on the LGBTQI community and sex workers in Bangalore.

Ajita Banerjie got her Master’s degree in Social Work from Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai. As a part of her field project in TISS, she worked with the Kathkari Tribe in Maharashtra on issues of bonded labour at brick kilns and the effect of migration on health and education. For the final year dissertation, she studied the Hijra community in Mumbai and their negotiation with heteronormative spaces and structures in a gendered society. While in TISS, she worked as an intern with Alternative Law Forum, Bangalore, where she researched on gender-based violence on the LGBTQI community and sex workers in Bangalore.

Prior to TISS, she pursued B.A. in English (Hons.) from Ramjas College, Delhi University. During the three years of her undergraduate course, she engaged in various field study projects. During an internship project with CRY, she worked on a report on level of education and drug abuse in transit camps in Uttam Nagar, Delhi.

Research :

Through the scholarship at Hindu Centre, she hopes to further dwell into the gaps in India’s policies that have failed to include marginalised communities in the ambit of development. Her research would look at how a disguised form of bonded labour is carried out in brick kilns where the most marginalised populations who have been chronically poor are exploited under debt-bondage. She will also look at the gaps in the rural development schemes which force the Dalit and Tribal population of the country to succumb to exploitative work settings at brick kilns where the conditions are harsh and facilities negligible. Her research seeks to answer the question, "Why does bonded labour persist?".

Read Policy Report Modern Day Slavery: A Study of Tribals and Dalits as Bonded Labour in Brick Kilns here.

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