Tridivesh Singh Maini - Report Published

Tridivesh Singh Maini
Tridivesh Singh Maini is a New Delhi based Policy Analyst, and has worked earlier with The Observer Research Foundation, New Delhi, the Institute of South Asian Studies, Singapore, and The Indian Express, New Delhi. He is a visiting fellow with The Jindal School of International Affairs, OP Jindal Global University, Sonipat, Haryana, and an Asia Society India-Pakistan Regional Young Leaders Initiative (IPRYLI) Fellow (2013-2014). His research interests include Indo-Pak relations, the role of border states in India's foreign policy and the New Silk Road.

Tridivesh Singh Maini is a New Delhi based Policy Analyst. He is a visiting fellow with The Jindal School of International Affairs, OP Jindal Global University, Sonipat, Haryana, and an Asia Society India-Pakistan Regional Young Leaders Initiative (IPRYLI) Fellow (2013-2014). His research interests include Indo-Pak relations, the role of border states in India's foreign policy and the New Silk Road. Maini is a regular contributor for The Friday Times (Lahore) and The Diplomat.

Maini has worked earlier with The Observer Research Foundation, New Delhi, the Institute of South Asian Studies, Singapore; and The Indian Express, New Delhi. While working with The Indian Express, Maini wrote a weekly column, 'Printline Pakistan'.

He authored ‘South Asian Cooperation and the Role of the Punjabs’, and co-authored ‘Humanity Amidst Insanity: Hope During and After the Indo-Pak Partition’ with Tahir Malik and Ali Farooq Malik. Maini is also one of the editors of ‘Warriors after War: Indian and Pakistani Retired Military Leaders Reflect on Relations between the Two countries, Past Present and Future’, published by Peter Lang (2011).

Research :

As a Public Policy Scholar at The Hindu Centre, Maini will analyse whether the increasing intervention of states in foreign policy is detrimental to national interest. For a while now, India’s relations with the outside world – including the neighbourhood – have been dominated by the discourse emanating from New Delhi. In the past few years, this has begun to change for a number of reasons; the increasing power of regional satraps, the liberalisation of the economy in 1991 and coalition politics. Apart from an in-depth analysis of the changing role of states in foreign policy, the project will study examples from other parts of the world, and attempt to draw lessons from countries where sub-national participation in foreign policy is encouraged by federal governments.

Read Policy Report ' Gujarat, Rajasthan and Punjab: The Need for a Border States Group' here.

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